Jashn-e Sadeh: Persian and Kurdish music
A concert to celebrate the invention of fire in mythology

Jashn-e Sadeh: Persian and Kurdish music

When: Sat 28 January 2017 19:30-21:30
Where: Khalili Lecture Theatre


You are cordially invited to Jashn-e sadeh celebrations with Persian & Kurdish music. In this concert.

Performed by teh SOAS Iranian band and guest performers.

Date: Saturday 28 January 2016

Time: Doors open from 7pm. Concert starts at 7.30pm

Venue: Khalili Lecture Theatre, SOAS University of London, Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square, London WC1H 0XG, UK

Ticket prices are £15 Regular / £10 Concs/ £6 Students


[Samples of previous concerts] 
https://www.facebook.com/peyman.heydarian/videos/10154609291090733/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=en5_7ZgnuuU 
https://soundcloud.com/santurista/earl-of-jura-and-deylamanwav
https://soundcloud.com/santurista/impro-peyman-jamie-sass-16-11-16
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=OxFJJD2JDPE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbJs33zB8v8 
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HQ9TmR-6_Bo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB00NMMQwAE 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvSwbBKV_3o 

Event on Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1818766675052424/

About Jashn-e Sadeh:
Legends of how man learned to make fire are as numerous as there are ancient nations. The most striking is the Iranian legend, preserved, among other writings, in Ferdowsi's Shahnameh. To put it in short: Fire was accidentally discovered when a flint-axe, thrown by King Hushang to kill a snake, missed and struck a rock and threw a spark. That sparked the idea to kindle fire by striking two pieces of flint together. This theory is confirmed by archeologists to be the most probable means of its discovery in the early stone stage.
Hushang, the Iranian legend says, celebrated the discovery by throwing a feast, a feast that has been kept alive through ages. It is held every year on 10 Bahman (30 January), almost mid-winter. It is called “Sadeh,” meaning "century" because according to one popular tradition, it falls on the hundredth day from 21 October, the beginning of winter among ancient Iranians. Another explanation is that it is 50 nights and 50 days away from Nowruz. Or, it is the contracted form of the Avestan “saredha,” Persian “sard,” meaning "cold, winter". Sadeh is also celebrated in a grand festival in Hawraman, Kurdistan, where tens of thousands of people gather in Hawraman Takht, an ancient village and play the daf and sing around fire.


Looking forward to seeing you,

With Best Wishes,

The SOAS Daf Society


This webpage was last updated on: 02 Sep 2014 12:54